Monday, 30 March 2009

This kinda upsets me.

If you want to see the original BBC article check this out.

http://tinyurl.com/cwsrqt

This is the essence of "do as little as possible".

Maybe I am missing there point about health but as you know a
little walk in the park is not going to cut it when it comes to
healthy weight.

1. Reduce Stress.
2. Sleep
3. Lift weights, preferably your own!
4. Eat supportively (don't under-eat!)

These are ethe big four. Sure they split into a million more
things. But none of them would be "take 100 steps"

Maybe it's targeting the ultra "de-conditioned" person, who hasn't
seen the light of day in a looong time.

Maybe.

Or maybe it's an easy way out.

You might notice I am not a big fan of that.

My advice, walk to a professional. Thats when the real fun starts!

In health,

Todd

Thursday, 19 March 2009

Power of the Mind

You need to know that being fit is not nearly so difficult as the
"experts" would have you believe.

That makes it tough for me to "pitch" health.

Everyone thinks I am selling snake oil when I begin to say how easy
something is.

I suppose I should clarify a bit.

The process, the parts of the plan, the details that need to be
observed. That is the easy part.

The part that takes the most effort is overcoming the roadblocks.

The derailments, distractions, old habits or patterns we've all
allowed ourselves to become comfortable with. In short, our brain!

THAT is where the most effort goes. Not in the activity (because
it's fun, right?), not in the planning, not in the food to eat.

It's in the consistent application of your energy to better our
physical, and I would argue, mental state.

This is a short one, but think about it. It's a good one to mull over.

But not for long!

Thursday, 12 March 2009

Bring the Intensity, Ladies!

Here is an opportunity for me to get on my soapbox.

When you workout, make it intense. That's not to say unsafe.
Intense. There is a difference.

Especially the ladies. We've grown up thinking that physical
exertion is dangerous.

Nothing could be farther from the truth. And from personal
experience women are all too often told to not be too physical.

Makes no sense. Because once my female clients get around to upping
there intensity they tend to outperform the men. For tow reasons.

1. They have better defined goals. By the time they have gotten to
me they have thoroughly thought out why they are there and what
they want the outcome to be. Most men, not so much.

2. No use for being macho. They don't rush, LISTEN to the coaching,
make changes, and maintain form until failure.

Sounds like a great client? Yup, very often.

And here is the best part. Once you raise the intensity of workouts
the results automatically accelerate. This is how our body
responds. Walk in the park, not much happens. Very low effort, very
low return. High intensity, high returns.

Now, unlike the popular conception that high intensity must make
you vomit, nothing could be farther from the truth. It's about
finding your limits and performing at that level on a consistent
basis, pushing to the next level.

So men, take notice. If the ladies ever figure out that intense
workouts are not the sole domain of men, we are in deep, deep
trouble. Though I think it's for the better!

Let's go ladies, show 'em how it's done!

In health,

Todd

Thursday, 5 March 2009

To sleep, perchance to dream.

First things first.

Two months down! Have you gotten 8 weeks of activity in? Are you
two months closer to your goals? Only 3 months before the
spring/summer clothes are out. So you are almost half way there.
Get started today if you haven't!

Now to the sleep!

I've been a huge nap advocate for a long time. Been a napper for
even longer.

Sleep relaxes you, mentally and physically. Corporations are
adapting this into their workdays to reap the benefits of more
productive, well rested employees!

So you have got to be serious about your rest, especially if
someone is willing to invest that much money into it.

Here is a recent snippet (with studies quoted) from the WIRED blog.

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/nightshift.html

But not only does it effect productivity, it also influences the
midline.

I used to consult at an eating disorders clinic and studies that
demonstrated this relationship were trotted out from time to time
to help people understand the relationship between good sleep and a
healthy weight.

Yes it is difficult. Especially for shift workers. But recognition
and strategies to combat the effects of reduced sleep must be used
if you are in a difficult situation such as this. I used to work
the back shift, for 6 years, actually. And I used some of these
strategies.

Be consistent. Get to sleep at the same time every day.

Don't break up your sleep. 5 hours in a row is better than getting
up 4 times during your 8 hour sleep. Much better.

Nap. 15 mintues is a nap, NOT 2 hours. Pick a quiet time, take some
big relaxing breaths, and doze off. Set your alarm to get you up in
15 minutes. Have some water ready for you.

Don't mess with your circadian rhythms. They will bite back.

So be consistent.

Have a good weekend everyone!